Tested for you: “Lifting Gua Sha” from Rose Quartz by Payot

Rosenquarz-Guasha-massage-tool-payot-cultureandcream-blogpost

I’ve always been skeptical about massage tools like the Gua Sha and others. And I also have to admit, being too impatient. I tried most of them a few times and then put them down again and left their fate to be forgotten in some drawer.

But recently I experienced a facial in Dr. Miriam Rehbein’s office in Munich, as you may have read on my blog, with a fabulous massage of the cheek-chin contour. When I then put my “Gua Sha” stone at home exactly where the beautician’s fingers had massaged, it really surprised me: It felt almost as good.

Three sides, three options

Since then, I’ve been doing it every day, stroking the “V” side of the Gua Sha up along the jawline from chin to ear. Like two fingers, the “V” encompasses the jawbone and its tissue. And because the cool rose quartz feels so comfortable on the skin, I go up higher in the face and use it to work on the cheek area.

For the cheeks, I use the long side of the stone and move diagonally upwards along the edge of the face. Finally, it is the turn of the eye area by stroking the narrow corner of the tool from the outer corner of the eye to the hairline.

After regular use, my face, especially the jaw line, looks tighter and more relaxed overall. All 26 muscles appear relaxed and the lymph flow stimulated. I prefer to use the 15 minutes in front of the TV during the daily evening news – just the right amount of time. I think this time I will on the ball, in this case the rose quartz stone.

Where does the Gua Sha actually come from?

Massages with precious stones such as rose quartz and jade have a long tradition in Chinese medicine (TCM). Gua Sha (pronounced “Quascha”) is made up of the two words “Gua” and “Sha”, which mean something like “scrape” and “reddening of the skin”. The stone is gently “scraped” over the face so that the skin turns red slightly due to the increased blood flow. In Chinese medicine it is assumed that after a successful facial massage, the skin is freed of toxins and blockages.

Rose quartz or jade – what’s the difference? In TCM, different effects are ascribed to the two healing stones. Jade is said to have an anti-inflammatory, cleansing and decongestant effect. Favorable for blemished skin. The pink energy stone is supposed to relieve stress and relieve tension. Rose quartz is therefore particularly suitable for irritated and irritated skin.

Always keep it nice and clean!

The Gua Sha massage should only be performed on clean skin to prevent bacteria from spreading on the face. You can massage on the “bare” skin (as I prefer), but also over a cream. Some also recommend an oil to make the stone easier to slide on the surface. But I don’t think much of facial oils because the molecules are so large that they stay on the skin and have an occlusive effect. This means that the skin “dries out” over time. But everyone has to decide for themselves.

In no case should you forget to thoroughly clean the Gua Sha stone after the massage so that you can work with a clean tool again the next time and not provoke any impurities. It is also particularly refreshing and awakening if you keep the stone in the refrigerator or put it in cold water before use. The slight cold causes the pores to contract, and the complexion appears finer and rosier in an instant.

“Lifting Gua Sha” by Payot, 25.50 euros
photos/illustration @payot

German

Gua Sha, rose quartz

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


Traveling and Beauty are my passion.
More about me and cultureandcream

Subscribe to Culture & Cream.

    Yes I want to subscribe to the english version of CultureAndCreme's newsletter. (No worries, we only send once a month!)


    Explanations regarding through your consent accepted terms about success measurement, our use of MailChimp and your right of withdrawal, you can find in our Privacy Policy.

    Instagram.

    Pinterest.

    © 2020 Margit Rüdiger | Impressum | Privacy Agreement| Cookie Policy